Psychology graduate // Photographer

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follow me on instagram! @sukideen :)

follow me on instagram! @sukideen :)

neurosciencestuff:

Turmeric compound boosts regeneration of brain stem cells
A bioactive compound found in turmeric promotes stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the brain, reveals new research published today in the open access journal Stem Cell Research & Therapy. The findings suggest aromatic turmerone could be a future drug candidate for treating neurological disorders, such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.
The study looked at the effects of aromatic (ar-) turmerone on endogenous neutral stem cells (NSC), which are stem cells found within adult brains. NSC differentiate into neurons, and play an important role in self-repair and recovery of brain function in neurodegenerative diseases. Previous studies of ar-turmerone have shown that the compound can block activation of microglia cells. When activated, these cells cause neuroinflammation, which is associated with different neurological disorders. However, ar-turmerone’s impact on the brain’s capacity to self-repair was unknown.
Researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine in Jülich, Germany, studied the effects of ar-turmerone on NSC proliferation and differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Rat fetal NSC were cultured and grown in six different concentrations of ar-turmerone over a 72 hour period. At certain concentrations, ar-turmerone was shown to increase NSC proliferation by up to 80%, without having any impact on cell death. The cell differentiation process also accelerated in ar-turmerone-treated cells compared to untreated control cells.
To test the effects of ar-turmerone on NSC in vivo, the researchers injected adult rats with ar-turmerone. Using PET imaging and a tracer to detect proliferating cells, they found that the subventricular zone (SVZ) was wider, and the hippocampus expanded, in the brains of rats injected with ar-turmerone than in control animals. The SVZ and hippocampus are the two sites in adult mammalian brains where neurogenesis, the growth of neurons, is known to occur.
Lead author of the study, Adele Rueger, said: “While several substances have been described to promote stem cell proliferation in the brain, fewer drugs additionally promote the differentiation of stem cells into neurons, which constitutes a major goal in regenerative medicine. Our findings on aromatic turmerone take us one step closer to achieving this goal.”
Ar-turmerone is the lesser-studied of two major bioactive compounds found in turmeric. The other compound is curcumin, which is well known for its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties.

I did a presentation on the effect of natural remedies on neurodegenerative disorders as a recent advancement, mainly focusing on coconut oil and turmeric for it’s properties that support breaking down of amyloid beta plaques (which play a big role in Alzheimers). People expected more of a pharmaceutical approach which isn’t my standpoint on things so the idea wasn’t popular but this is exciting news and I can’t wait for more studies to be done on human participants! Go eat some turmeric and antioxidants guys and help your brain :)

neurosciencestuff:

Turmeric compound boosts regeneration of brain stem cells

A bioactive compound found in turmeric promotes stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the brain, reveals new research published today in the open access journal Stem Cell Research & Therapy. The findings suggest aromatic turmerone could be a future drug candidate for treating neurological disorders, such as stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.

The study looked at the effects of aromatic (ar-) turmerone on endogenous neutral stem cells (NSC), which are stem cells found within adult brains. NSC differentiate into neurons, and play an important role in self-repair and recovery of brain function in neurodegenerative diseases. Previous studies of ar-turmerone have shown that the compound can block activation of microglia cells. When activated, these cells cause neuroinflammation, which is associated with different neurological disorders. However, ar-turmerone’s impact on the brain’s capacity to self-repair was unknown.

Researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine in Jülich, Germany, studied the effects of ar-turmerone on NSC proliferation and differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Rat fetal NSC were cultured and grown in six different concentrations of ar-turmerone over a 72 hour period. At certain concentrations, ar-turmerone was shown to increase NSC proliferation by up to 80%, without having any impact on cell death. The cell differentiation process also accelerated in ar-turmerone-treated cells compared to untreated control cells.

To test the effects of ar-turmerone on NSC in vivo, the researchers injected adult rats with ar-turmerone. Using PET imaging and a tracer to detect proliferating cells, they found that the subventricular zone (SVZ) was wider, and the hippocampus expanded, in the brains of rats injected with ar-turmerone than in control animals. The SVZ and hippocampus are the two sites in adult mammalian brains where neurogenesis, the growth of neurons, is known to occur.

Lead author of the study, Adele Rueger, said: “While several substances have been described to promote stem cell proliferation in the brain, fewer drugs additionally promote the differentiation of stem cells into neurons, which constitutes a major goal in regenerative medicine. Our findings on aromatic turmerone take us one step closer to achieving this goal.”

Ar-turmerone is the lesser-studied of two major bioactive compounds found in turmeric. The other compound is curcumin, which is well known for its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties.

I did a presentation on the effect of natural remedies on neurodegenerative disorders as a recent advancement, mainly focusing on coconut oil and turmeric for it’s properties that support breaking down of amyloid beta plaques (which play a big role in Alzheimers). People expected more of a pharmaceutical approach which isn’t my standpoint on things so the idea wasn’t popular but this is exciting news and I can’t wait for more studies to be done on human participants! Go eat some turmeric and antioxidants guys and help your brain :)

nobody can save you but yourself and you’re worth saving. it’s a war not easily won but if anything is worth winning then this is it.

nobody can save you but yourself and you’re worth saving. it’s a war not easily won but if anything is worth winning then this is it.

Kristen McMenamy by Tim Walker for W Magazine.

Kristen McMenamy by Tim Walker for W Magazine.

So, transform yourself first…

Because you are young and have dreams and want to do something meaningful, that in itself, makes you our future and our hope.

Keep expanding your horizon, decolonize your mind, and cross borders.

- Yuri Kochiyama

(Source: levanstuff, via mylegsgavein)

(Source: rifles, via elletcetera)

Hello, i love your psychology post and I actually started doing a psychology course at college on Thursday and my lecturer gave me these 2 pieces of research and I have to point out the things that are wrong with them but I've been in the class for 2 days and i have no idea what I'm doing and I was wondering if you could please help me?

Ofcourse sweetie! Critically analysing research is a really good skill because it makes you realise where theres gaps in research and how to improve your own. I usually critique by looking at the research methods and sample. If the sample was done on students, or a group of people all the same age and race, which most research done within Universities are, it’s not a good representation of all people and therefore is a weakness. The methodology behind the research is also a point of interest - each method has their pros and cons, for example interviewing someone might make participants give a socially desirable answer to avoid being judged etc, just look into how and who the research was conducted on and it should give you some clues to start with, I hope I managed to give abit of a helpful example for you! Congratulations into getting into college and the best of luck with your course! If you need any more help, feel free to ask :)

xo

Before Sunrise / Sunset / Midnight, one of my favourite film trilogies 

soo recently i’ve realised that many people don’t always have someone to turn to or many friends they can open up to, especially when they’re depressed and anxious, and i can see how for some people it’s much easier to sometimes turn to strangers who won’t judge and don’t know your backstory. if anyone ever wants somebody to talk to, this is just to let you know that i’m here for you. even if i suck at checking this, i care and i want to help and i’m here to listen or offer advice or anything else that may help and you are not alone. 

feel free to message me at any time via my ask.

lots of love xxxx

A doctor chronicled the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in one of his patients by collecting her signatures from medical forms over the years.

A doctor chronicled the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in one of his patients by collecting her signatures from medical forms over the years.

photography by jessica tremp

photography by jessica tremp

(Source: sukideen)